Hemagglutinin Recombinant Protein Cat. No.: 95-101

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psi-iconSpecifications
SPECIES:Influenza A virus (A/chicken/Jilin/9/2004(H5N1))
SOURCE SPECIES:E. coli
SEQUENCE:aa. 17 - 338
FUSION TAG:Fusion Partner: His-tag and strepII-tag at N-terminus
TESTED APPLICATIONS:ELISA, WB
APPLICATIONS:This recombinant protein can be used for WB and ELISA. For research use only.
BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY: N/A
psi-iconProperties
PURITY:~95%
PREDICTED MOLECULAR WEIGHT:39 kDa (Calculated)
PHYSICAL STATE:Liquid
BUFFER:1X PBS containing 0.1% SDS and 0.02% NaN3
STORAGE CONDITIONS:Store in working aliquots at -70˚C. Avoid freeze/thaw cycles. When working with proteins care should be taken to keep recombinant protein at a cool and stable temperature.
psi-iconAdditional Info
ALTERNATE NAMES:H5N1 Hemagglutinin HA1, H5N1 Hemagglutinin, H5N1 HA1, HA1
ACCESSION NO.:AAT76166
PROTEIN GI NO.:50365729
OFFICIAL SYMBOL:HA
GENE ID:3654620
psi-iconBackground and References
BACKGROUND:Influenza A virus is a major public health threat, killing more than 30,000 people per year in the USA (1). Novel influenza virus strains caused by genetic drift and viral recombination emerge periodically to which humans have little or no immunity, resulting in devastating pandemics. Influenza A can exist in a variety of animals, but it is in birds that all subtypes can be found (2). These subtypes are classified based on the combination of the virus coat glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) subtypes. HA interacts with host cell surface proteins containing oligosaccharides with terminal sialyl residues. Its extracellular region has two domains (HA1 and HA2); HA1 is cleaved from the main hemagglutinin protein by the host immune system. During 1997, an H5N1 avian influenza virus was determined to be the cause of death in 6 of 18 infected patients in Hong Kong (3). This more recent virulent strain of H5N1 is now seen in Africa and Europe, as well as in Southeast Asia. There is some evidence of human to human spread of this virus, but it is thought that the efficiency of this type of transmission is low (4). Virus isolated from a human infected with the H5N1 strain in 1997 could bind to oligosaccharides from human as well as avian sources, indicating its species-jumping ability (5). This HA1 recombinant protein is recognized by several ProSci hemagglutinin antibodies.
REFERENCES:1) Thompson WW, Shay DK, Weintraub, et al. Mortality associated with influenza and respiratory syncytial virus in the United States. JAMA 2003; 289:179-186.
2) Alexander DJ. A review of avian influenza. Proceedings of the European Society for Veterinary Virology (ESVV) Symposium on Influenza Viruses of Wild and Domestic Animals. Vet. Microbiol. 2000; 74:3-13.
3) Shortridge KF, Zhou NN, Guan Y, et al. Characterization of avian H5N1 influenza viruses from poultry in Hong Kong. Virol. 1998; 252:331-342.
4) Buxton Bridges C, Katz JM, Seto WH, et al. Risk of influenza A (H5N1) infection among health care workers exposed to patients with influenza A (H5N1), Hong Kong. J. Inf. Dis. 2000; 181:344-8.

FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY.

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