FGF R4 / CD334 Recombinant Protein Cat. No.: 11-471

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psi-iconSpecifications
SPECIES:Mouse
SOURCE SPECIES:HEK293 cells
SEQUENCE:Leu 17 - Asp 366
FUSION TAG:His Tag
TESTED APPLICATIONS:ELISA, WB
APPLICATIONS:This protein carries a polyhistidine tag at the C-terminus. The protein has a calculated MW of 40.7 kDa. The protein migrates as 55-67 kDa under reducing (R) condition (SDS-PAGE) due to glycosylation.
psi-iconProperties
PURITY:>90% as determined by SDS-PAGE.
PREDICTED MOLECULAR WEIGHT:40.7 kDa
PHYSICAL STATE:Lyophilized
BUFFER:PBS, pH7.4
STORAGE CONDITIONS:Lyophilized Protein should be stored at -20˚C or lower for long term storage. Upon reconstitution, working aliquots should be stored at -20˚C or -70˚C. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
psi-iconAdditional Info
ALTERNATE NAMES:FGFR4,CD334,JTK2,MGC20292,TKF
ACCESSION NO.:NP_032037.2
OFFICIAL SYMBOL:Fgfr4
GENE ID:14186
psi-iconBackground and References
BACKGROUND:Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4(FGFR4) is also known as CD334, JTK2, hydroxyaryl-protein kinase, TKF, protein-tyrosine kinase . The FGFR4 gene provides instructions for making a protein called fibroblast growth factor receptor 4. This protein is part of a family of fibroblast growth factor receptors that share similar structures and functions. These receptor proteins play a role in important processes such as cell division, regulating cell growth and maturation, formation of blood vessels, wound healing, and embryo development.The FGFR4 protein interacts with specific growth factors to conduct signals from the environment outside the cell to the nucleus. The nucleus responds to these signals by switching on or off appropriate genes that help the cell adjust to changes in the environment. In response, the cell might divide, move, or mature to take on specialized functions. Although specific functions of FGFR4 remain unclear, studies indicate that the gene is involved in muscle development and the maturation of bone cells in the skull. The FGFR4 gene may also play a role in the development and maintenance of specialized cells (called foveal cones) in the light-sensitive layer (the retina) at the back of the eye.
REFERENCES:1) Eswarakumar VP, et al., 2005, Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. Apr;16(2):139-49.
2) Wang J, et al., 2004, Clin Cancer Res. Sep 15;10(18 Pt 1):6169-78.

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