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Why are antibodies produced in the body?

Why are antibodies produced in the body?

Antibodies are produced in the body to serve 3 major purposes in the immune system: neutralization, opsonization, and compliment protein activation. Each of these functions helps to protect the body from potentially harmful pathogens. Learn more at ProSci Inc.

 

 

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Friday, May 26, 2017 1:56:18 PM America/Los_Angeles
Comments | Posted in Science Corner By Jonathan Felix

April 2017 Antibody UpdateApril 2017: The Antibody Update

In the April 2017 Antibody Update, ProSci presents to you a virucidal peptide found in the skin of frogs, evidence of new and hopeful RNA-drugs, and the innate immune systems role in congenital autoimmunity. 

 

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Friday, May 5, 2017 12:17:25 PM America/Los_Angeles
Comments | Posted in News By Yousif Slaiwa

March 2017 Antibody UpdateMarch 2017: The Antibody Update

This month the Antibody Update showcases caffeine as a potential anti-inflammatory agent, how mTOR is related to granuloma formation, and a retinal transplant using induced pluripotent stem cells. Learn more here!


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Friday, March 31, 2017 10:00:00 AM America/Los_Angeles
Comments | Posted in News By Yousif Slaiwa

ProSci Blog Personalized MedicineProblems with Immunotherapy

Immune system checkpoint inhibition may not always be the perfect way to target cancer. Why is it that some patients do not respond positively to certain immunotherapy treatments like Ipilimumab? This blog takes into account the immune system's convoluted nature to understand how immune checkpoint antibodies may not be the problem, and how personalized medicine could help.

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017 10:00:00 AM America/Los_Angeles
Comments | Posted in Science Corner By Yousif Slaiwa

T-cell Activation ProSci BlogT-cell Activation: The Purpose of CD28, CTLA-4, and CD80/CD86 

Cancer immunotherapy involves targeting receptors and ligands of T-cells and tumor cells to amplify an immune response. By targeting these receptors and ligands, T-cell anti-cancer activity can be regulated. This blog explains how the receptors CD28 and CTLA-4 and their ligands CD80 and CD86 are involved in T-cell activation and inhibition. Take a look!

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Tuesday, January 17, 2017 10:00:00 AM America/Los_Angeles
Comments | Posted in Science Corner By Jonathan Felix
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