Avian Flu (H5N1) Protein Detection Set Cat. No.: PSI-1808

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psi-iconSpecifications
SPECIES REACTIVITY:Human
TESTED APPLICATIONS:ELISA
APPLICATIONS:These polyclonal antibodies can be used for detection of H5N1 Hemagglutinin or Neuraminidase proteins in bodily fluid or tissue by ELISA. Immunogenic peptides are provided as positive controls and to determine protein concentration. Each antibody will detect 10 ng of its corresponding peptide. Immunoblot applications are pending.
USER NOTE:Optimal dilutions for each application to be determined by the researcher.
SPECIFICITY:Efforts were made to use regions of each protein that appear to be relatively conserved across H5N1 sub-strains, but due to the inherent variability of the influenza virus, no guarantees can be made.
IMMUNOGEN:Rabbit polyclonal antibodies were raised against peptides corresponding to amino acid sequences from each of the corresponding proteins.
psi-iconSet Contents
Catalog Number 3427Catalog number 3427 — Avian Influenza Hemagglutinin Antibody
Catalog Number 3425Catalog number 3425 — Avian Influenza Hemagglutinin Antibody
Catalog Number 3423Catalog number 3423 — Avian Influenza Neuraminidase Antibody
Catalog Number 3421Catalog number 3421 — Avian Influenza Neuraminidase Antibody
Catalog Number 3427PCatalog number 3427P — Avian Influenza Hemagglutinin Peptide
Catalog Number 3425PCatalog number 3425P — Avian Influenza Hemagglutinin Peptide
Catalog Number 3423PCatalog number 3423P — Avian Influenza Neuriminidase Peptide
Catalog Number 3421PCatalog number 3421P — Avian Influenza Neuriminidase Peptide
psi-iconProperties
PHYSICAL STATE:Liquid
BUFFER:PBS containing 0.02% sodium azide.
CONCENTRATION:Antibody 1 mg/mL

Peptide 200 μg/mL
STORAGE CONDITIONS:H5N1 antibodies and peptides should be stored at -20˚C, stable for one year.
psi-iconAdditional Info
USER NOTE:Optimal dilutions for each application to be determined by the researcher.
psi-iconBackground
BACKGROUND:Influenza A virus is a major public health threat, killing more than 30,000 people per year in the USA. Novel influenza virus strains emerge periodically to which humans have little or no immunity, resulting in devastating pandemics. Influenza A can exist in a variety of animals; however it is in birds that all subtypes can be found. These subtypes are classified based on the combination of the virus coat glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) subtypes. During 1997, an H5N1 avian influenza virus was determined to be the cause of death in 6 of 18 infected patients in Hong Kong. There was some evidence of human to human spread of this virus, but it is thought that the transmission efficiency was fairly low. Although it has been known that cleavage site and glycosylation patterns of the HA protein play important roles in determining the pathogenicity of H5 avian influenza viruses, it has only recently been shown that an additional glycosylation site within the globular head of the neuraminidase protein also contributes to the high virulence of the H5N1 virus. H5N1 hemagglutinin interacts with cell surface proteins containing oligosaccharides with terminal sialyl residues. Virus isolated from a human infected with the H5N1 strain in 1997 could bind to oligosaccharides from human as well as avian sources, indicating its species-jumping ability.

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DETECTION-SETS FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY.

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