Apo A1 Recombinant Protein Cat. No.: 96-031

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psi-iconSpecifications
SPECIES:Human
SOURCE SPECIES:HEK293 cells
SEQUENCE:Arg 19 - Gln 267
FUSION TAG:His Tag
TESTED APPLICATIONS:WB
APPLICATIONS:This recombinant protein can be used for WB. For research use only.
BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY: Immobilized Human ApoAI at 10μg/mL (100μl/well) can bind biotinylated human SCARB1. The EC50 of biotinylated human SCARB1 is 10-100 ng/mL.
psi-iconProperties
PURITY:>95% as determined by SDS-PAGE.
PREDICTED MOLECULAR WEIGHT:29 kDa
PHYSICAL STATE:Lyophilized
BUFFER:PBS, pH7.4
STORAGE CONDITIONS:Lyophilized Protein should be stored at -20˚C or lower for long term storage. Upon reconstitution, working aliquots should be stored at -20˚C or -70˚C. Avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
psi-iconAdditional Info
ALTERNATE NAMES:Apolipoprotein A-I, APOA1, MGC117399
ACCESSION NO.:NP_000030.1
OFFICIAL SYMBOL:APOA1
GENE ID:335
psi-iconBackground and References
BACKGROUND:ApoA1 is also known as apolipoprotein A-I, ApoA-I , and is the major protein component of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma. It has a specific role in lipid metabolism. Chylomicrons secreted from the intestinal enterocyte also contain ApoA1 but it is quickly transferred to HDL in the bloodstream. The protein promotes cholesterol efflux from tissues to the liver for excretion. It is a cofactor for lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) which is responsible for the formation of most plasma cholesteryl esters. ApoA-I was also isolated as a prostacyclin (PGI2) stabilizing factor, and thus may have an anticlotting effect. Defects in the gene encoding it are associated with HDL deficiencies, including Tangier disease, and with systemic non-neuropathic amyloidosis. In addition, it has been shown that ApoA1 is implicated in the anti-endotoxin function of HDL via interaction with lipopolysaccharide or endotoxin.
REFERENCES:1) Wasan KM , et al. 2008, Nature Reviews Drug Discovery 7 (1): 84–99.
2) Yui Y, et al. 1988, J. Clin. Invest. 82 (3): 803–7.
3) Eggerman, T.L. et al., 1991, J. Lipid Res. 32: 821-828.
4) Voyiaziakis, E. et al., 1998. J. Lipid Res. 39: 313-321.

FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY.

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