Datasheet

ATR Antibody
CATALOG NUMBER: 3117

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Specifications
Properties
Additional Info
Background

Specifications

SPECIES REACTIVITY:Human, Mouse, Rat
TESTED APPLICATIONS:ELISA, IF, IHC-P, WB
APPLICATIONS:ATR antibody can be used for detection of ATR by Western blot at 0.5 to 2 μg/mL. Antibody can also be used for immunohistochemistry starting at 2 μg/mL. For immunofluorescence start at 10 μg/mL.
USER NOTE:Optimal dilutions for each application to be determined by the researcher.
POSITIVE CONTROL:1) Cat. No. 1211 - HepG2 Cell Lysate
 2) Cat. No. 1303 - Human Brain Tissue Lysate
 3) Cat. No. 10-301 - Human Brain Tissue Slide
PREDICTED MOLECULAR WEIGHT:Predicted: 36, 40, 60 kDa

Observed: 45 kDa
SPECIFICITY:At least three isoforms of ATR are known to exist; this antibody will detect all three isoforms.
IMMUNOGEN:ATR antibody was raised against a peptide corresponding to 13 amino acids near the center of human ATR.

The immunogen is located within amino acids 220 - 270 of ATR.
HOST SPECIES:Rabbit

Properties

PURIFICATION:ATR Antibody is Ion exchange chromatography purified.
PHYSICAL STATE:Liquid
BUFFER:ATR Antibody is supplied in PBS containing 0.02% sodium azide.
CONCENTRATION:1 mg/mL
STORAGE CONDITIONS:ATR antibody can be stored at 4˚C for three months and -20˚C, stable for up to one year. As with all antibodies care should be taken to avoid repeated freeze thaw cycles. Antibodies should not be exposed to prolonged high temperatures.
CLONALITY:Polyclonal
ISOTYPE:IgG
CONJUGATE:Unconjugated

Additional Info

ALTERNATE NAMES:ATR Antibody: ATR, GAPO, TEM8, ATR, Anthrax toxin receptor 1, Tumor endothelial marker 8
ACCESSION NO.:NP_444262
PROTEIN GI NO.:16933551
OFFICIAL SYMBOL:ANTXR1
GENE ID:84168

Background

BACKGROUND:ATR Antibody: The Anthrax toxin receptor (ATR) was initially discovered as the tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8). This protein, which exists in three isoforms (36, 40, and 60 kDa), is highly expressed in tumor vessels as well as in the vasculature of developing embryos, suggesting that it may normally play a role in angiogenesis. However, it also acts as the receptor for anthrax toxin. Following the binding of this protein by the protective antigen (PA) of anthrax, PA is cleaved and heptamerizes to form the binding site for both edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF). This complex is then endocytosed by the cell; acidification in endosomes allows the release of EF and LF into the cytoplasm where they interfere with MAPK signaling and induce apoptosis.
REFERENCES: 1) Carson-Walter EB, Watkins DN, Nanda A, et al. Cell surface tumor endothelial markers are conserved in mice and humans. Can. Res. 2001; 61:6649-6655.
2) Bradley KA, Mogridge J, Mourez M, et al. Identification of the cellular receptor for anthrax toxin. Nature 2001; 414:225-9.
3) Molloy S, Bresnahan PA, Thomas G, et al. Human furin is a calcium-dependent serine endoprotease that recognizes the sequence Arg-X-X-Arg and efficiently cleaves anthrax toxin protective antigen. J. Biol. Chem. 1992; 267:16396-402.
4) Duesbery N, Webb C, Vande Woude G, et al. Proteolytic inactivation of MAP-kinase-kinase by anthrax lethal factor. Science 1998; 280:734-6.

For Research Use Only